Information

Trained as an architect, Boyce decided on a career as an artist after meeting the painter David Cox in 1849 and 1851. He subsequently became friends with Rossetti, and was closely linked with the Pre-Raphaelite circle and with Ruskin.Contemporary critics commented on the subtlety of Boyce's handling of colour and his eye for an unconventional composition. The 'Art Journal' remarked in 1866 that 'Mr Boyce is singular in his choice of subjects, inasmuch as he loves to plant his sketching stool just where there is no subject' (vol. 5, July 1866, pp. 174-175).This watercolour depicts a village just north of Ashbourne, in the Peak District. It was exhibited at the Old Watercolour Society's summer exhibition in 1880. In his review for the 'Athenaeum' F. G. Stephens commented that the handling of the gate in the foreground was 'rather thin,' but praised it as a 'picture of sloping meadows, woodland, an ivy-clad church tower, a lane ending in a farm gate and a rough hedge.' He was particularly taken with Boyce's use of colour adding that 'the whole is suffused by warm grey light, and the tenderness of the subtly graded local colouring of the sky and foliage is exquisite' (1 May 1880, p. 573).

Trained as an architect, Boyce decided on a career as an artist after meeting the painter David Cox in 1849 and 1851. He subsequently became friends with Rossetti, and was closely linked with the Pre-Raphaelite circle and with Ruskin.Contemporary critics commented on the subtlety of Boyce's handling of colour and his eye for an unconventional composition. 'The Art Journal' remarked in 1866 that 'Mr Boyce is singular in his choice of subjects, inasmuch as he loves to plant his sketching stool just where there is no subject'.

  • Presented by Charles Fairfax Murray, 1904.
  • © Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery

Makers

Association Artist Organisation
Artist George Price Boyce -

Inscriptions

Type Position(s) Method Date(s) Notes
G. P. Boyce. 1879.1880
Signature and date bottom right Painted 1879-1880 Red paint.
 

Exhibitions

Catalogue No. Venue Date(s)
Summer Exhibition
232 Old Watercolour Society, London 1880 - 1880
 
Nineteenth Century Drawings
4 Museum of Art of the Socialist Republic of Romania, Bucharest 1982-12-02 - 1983-01-02
4 National Art Gallery and Alexander Soutzos Museum, Athens 1983-12-01 - 1983-03-06
4 National Gallery, Budapest 1983-03-17 - 1983-05-08
 
The Art of Watercolour
10 Castle Museum, Norwich 1987 - 1987
10 Manchester Art Gallery 1987 - 1987
 
George Price Boyce
61 Tate, London 1987-06-24 - 1987-08-16
 
British Watercolours from Birmingham
104 Toyko Station Gallery 1991-06-01 - 1991-07-07
104 Museum of Fine Arts, Gifu 1991-07-12 - 1991-08-18
104 Daimaru Museum, Umeda (Osaka) 1991-08-21 - 1991-09-02
104 Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Art, Kofu 1991-09-07 - 1991-10-20
104 Bankside Gallery, London (Royal Watercolour Society) 1992-01-22 - 1992-03-01
 
Visions of Love and Life: Pre-Raphaelite Art from the Birmingham Collection, England
109 Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, Washington 1995-03-09 - 1995-05-07
109 Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio 1995-05-27 - 1995-07-16
109 Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, Delaware 1995-08-11 - 1995-10-15
109 Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas 1995-11-04 - 1996-01-02
109 High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia 1996-01-23 - 1996-04-10
109 Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery 1996-05-25 - 1996-09-29
 
Victorian Watercolours
- Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery 2005-12-20 - 2006-04-23
 

Literature

Author(s) Date(s) Publisher Pages
Athenaeum
F G Stephens 1 May 1880 - p. 573
 
The Old Watercolour Society's Nineteenth Annual Volume
Arthur Street 1941 - repr. pl. 8
 
British Watercolours from Birmingham
Stephen Wildman 1991 Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery p. 217; repr. p. 120
 
Visions of Love and Life: Pre-Raphaelite Art from the Birmingham Collection, England
Stephen Wildman 1995 Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia p. 310; repr. p. 311

Associated places

Name Type
Thorpe, Derbyshire Depicted

Related work & resources

Discuss this work

Start a discussion about this work.

You need to login to discuss this work. Click here to login.

If you are not yet registered click here to become a member.
Find out more about membership